Ken Woolley

Pitt Point

 
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Pitt Point

Architect

Ken Woolley

Designed

1985

Architect Firm

Ancher Mortlock Murray

Builder

Brian Pettit & specialist trades

Location

5 Florence Terrace, Scotland Island

Specifications

Main House & separate Guest Pavilion, 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2 Study

External Living

3 Terraces, Deck, Breezeway and Outdoor Room/Dining from Viewing Terrace

Photography

© Tom Ferguson

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Introduction

An important part of Australian architectural history can be found on a north-facing, deep waterfront site on Scotland Island in Sydney’s Pittwater. Built in the mid-Eighties, Pitt Point represents a collaboration between multi-award-winning architect Ken Woolley AM and visionary developer Brian Pettit. As a young architect, Woolley had designed houses in the 1960s for Pettit’s groundbreaking project home company Pettit + Sevitt. That close relationship continued at Pitt Point with Woolley’s playful design for Pettit’s own house, in which various elements reference the businessman’s love of sailing.

Ken Woolley, one of the most celebrated and prolific Australian architects, designed only a handful of one-off houses. We believe Pitt Point is the most bespoke house of all. It is in near-original condition, which makes the house an even rarer discovery.”

Modern House

The Design

Crafted as a series of timber pavilions like fishermans’ huts, the house comprises an oregon-lined one-bedroomed main building, with boatshed, plus various outdoor spaces positioned for differing weather conditions, and a two-bedroomed, two-bathroomed guest pavilion with breezeway living area. Over the years, Pitt Point has been used as a holiday house as well as lived in full-time, and works equally well either way. The fact that it remains virtually unaltered over the years is testament to Woolley’s thoughtful, liveable and enduring design.

Domain: House of the Week

We are privileged to be Domain’s first
2018 House of the Week
9 | 10 | February 2018
Thank you to Kate Farrelly

Register your interest to view

Modern House Estate Agents
National: 1300 814 768
International: +61 2 8014 5363
Email: viewings@modernhouse.co

 

Sustainability + Structure

Environmentally designed to maximise North orientation

Orientated to maximise the prevailing North Easterlies

Protected from the Southerlies

Overhanging eves

Cross ventilation

Passive heating and cooling

Central gas fireplace

Solar panels

Fully ducted air-conditioning

Onsite rainwater collection: 24,000 litres

Connection to mains water if required (rare)

Bio-cycle waste water treatment plant

Timber with concrete slab

External: Western Red Cedar - painted

Internal: Number 1 Grade quality Oregon - natural

Native vegetation & trees

Substantial sandstone lanscaping

 

Features

Deep water jetty with 'Wavebreaker' berth (rare)

Deep water mooring

Working boat shed

Slipway (rare)

Close to public ferry for easy guest access by public transport

Register your interest to view

Modern House Estate Agents
National: 1300 814 768
International: +61 2 8014 5363
Email: viewings@modernhouse.co

Location

The house enjoys one of the most enviable positions on Pittwater. Pitt Point is a quiet oasis, capturing huge northern vistas from its elevated vantage point and only separated from the mainland by an eight minute commuter boat ride from Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club (RPA), Newport.

Pittwater is just over 25km or about an hour’s drive north of Sydney’s bustling CBD is Pittwater, the most northerly of the city’s waterways, a beautiful, peaceful, natural harbour, protected by Barrenjoey headland, with its iconic lighthouse. Surrounded mostly by Ku-ring-ai National Park, the area is a pristine eco system which houses an abundance of native flora and fauna.  

Nestled at the southern end of this magnificent waterway is Scotland Island which recently celebrated its bi-centenary and was named by Andrew Thompson in memory of his homeland after receiving the original grant from Lachlan Macquarie. Thompson primarily used the island as a salt production facility for the fledgling colony until the late nineteenth century when it began being planned for holiday accommodation as a respite from the city’s harsh summer climate.

Today, Scotland Island is part of the ‘Offshore Community’, an area in Pittwater that also includes the Bays (Elvina, Lovett, Little Lovett and Morning), a total community of only around 500 houses, nearly half of which are waterfront homes.

The surrounding Pittwater has become an aquatic playground, a perfect area for sailing, boating, kayaking, fishing, bush walking and swimming throughout the year. The water temperature varies from about 17°C in winter to around 22°C in summer.

The weather is moderated by the area’s proximity to the ocean. The warmest month is January, with an average air temperature range of 18.6 – 25.9°C. In winter, temperatures rarely drop below 5°C in coastal areas. The coldest month is July, with an average range of 8.0 – 16.2°C. Frost does not exist in this coastal area.

Going to-and-fro is a simple and everyday joy for those who love being on the water. The current owners enjoy parking facilitates and a berth for their commuter boat at RPA. Church Point also has parking and facilities for commuter boats.

Arriving at the private jetty by commuter boat or water taxi is made more comfortable still with the protected berth. This is a rare and highly prized feature of offshore living. Guests can also enjoy a fuss-free ferry ride from Church Point, alighting Tennis Wharf, which is adjacent to the house at Catherine Park.

There is a strong sense of community on the island which can be seen at the website dedicated to the island and its residents, click here.

 
 

The Architect

Kenneth Frank Charles Woolley, AM B Arch, Hon DSc Arch Sydney LFRAIA, FTSE, Architect, (29 May 1933 – 25 November 2015). In a career spanning 60 years, he is best known for his contributions to project housing with Pettit + Sevitt, the Wilkinson Award winning Woolley House in Mosman, and his longstanding partnership with Sydney Ancher and Bryce Mortlock. He is regarded as being a prominent figure in the development of the Sydney School movement and Australian vernacular building.

Woolley was awarded the highest architectural honour in Australia when he received the RAIA Gold Medal in 1993.

The architectural community was deeply saddened by the passing of Ken Woolley in 2015 and Tone Wheeler eloquently expressed what many knew so well.

“Ken Woolley was the most complete architect of the modern era in Australia. He designed buildings of every type and scale – from small homes and project houses to office towers, apartments, churches, corporate headquarters and civic squares, for public and private clients from prestigious to poor. He was the quintessential Sydney architect; almost all of his work can be found within forty kilometres of the Sydney Town Hall (for which he designed an office tower and public square). He was a founder of the “The Sydney School” in houses, and notably his AS Hook RAIA Gold Medal address in 1994 was entitled “State of the Art in Sydney”. Every building he designed was different (there being no “starchitect” repetition or house style) but every one seems right for its place and purpose, particularly as they respond to the sharp sunlight and forceful topography of Sydney. His design approach, particularly the planning, was rooted in the modern humanism of his early study and travels, together with sensitive but uncompromising forms and materiality, often with stepping outlines following the underlying Sydney sandstone.”

Excerpt from the obituary written for ArchitectureAU by Tone Wheeler. Full editorial, click here.

Architect's Drawings

Architect's Awards and Publication of the House

- Personal Awards

1988 Member of the Order of Australia (AM)

1993 The Gold Medal of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects

2001 Fellow of the Academy of Technological Science and Engineering

2003 The Centenary of Federation Medal for services to structural engineering

2010 Honorary doctorate from the University of Sydney

- Professional Awards

National Robin Boyd Award 1987

Sulman Award 1963

Wilkinson Award, 1962, 1968, 1982, 1987

And a further 37 awards across Residential, Commercial, Public and Adaptive Re-use design

- Publication of the House

Monograph: The Master Architect Series IV - Ken Woolley and Ancher, Mortlock & Woolley Selected and Current Works. Published by Images Publishing, 1999

Monograph: Australian Architects - Ken Woolley. Published by Royal Australian Institute of Architects (RAIA), 1985

HOUSES magazine, Revisited Section, current issue #120

Register your interest to view

Modern House Estate Agents
National: 1300 814 768
International: +61 2 8014 5363
Email: viewings@modernhouse.co

Photography credit: Some furniture for photography supplied by Cult.